Total of 293 posts

Herein you’ll find articles on a very wide variety of topics about technology in the consumer space (mostly) and items of personal interest to me.

If you’d like to read my professional engineering articles and whitepapers, they can be found at Control System Space

I have also participated in and created several podcsts most notably Pragmatic and Causality and all of my podcasts can be found at The Engineered Network.

Kit vs Tamron vs Prime Shoot-out

I’ve been reading and learning, trying and fine-tuning my photography setup (heck, isn’t that what all photography enthusiasts do?) and I’ve been looking at the gaps in my lens arsenal and looking also for duplication and overlap.

I started out loving Zoom lenses with my 55-200mm Nikon providing most of the work for outdoors sports, but with two of the key kinds of sports photography I was being called on happening at night or indoors in poor lighting (Netball and Basketball) then I had to invest in a better zoom with the Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 being my choice.

It does a fine job and did double-duty for large group shots where I didn’t have space to move back and needed to work in close, and using a DX camera (Nikon D5500 and then D500) the 24mm short end wasn’t quite short enough. I invested in a kit lens second-hand on a lark, thinking it could do fine at the short end (18mm) for those tight situations. Unfortunately I kept having trouble with the sharpness of both the 24-70mm Tamron and the 18-55mm Nikon kit lenses.

A thought occurred to me that I’d become spoilt by my growing prime collection (35mm f/1.8, 50mm f/1.8, 85mm f/1.8) which are sharp as a tack at pretty much every aperture. Then I read many, many semi-professional and professional lens reviews to try and decide if I was imagining things.

Then I thought, “Hey, I could just do my own test…”

…and here it is…

I decided to test their sharpness indoors, with controlled lighting conditions setting the D500 on a tripod, set with a Timer and adjusting the shutter speed leaving a constant ISO160. Setting the back of some packaging with a mixture of text and symbols as the target with the tripod at the same distance for each. The only variable I think I could have done better was the distance from the lens element to the target was slightly different owing to the different lens designs and resulting imprecision of the 50mm mark on each Zoom ensuring the exact same image scale in the frame, but it’s close enough to make the point.

Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 / Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-f/5.6 / Nikon 50mm f/1.8 Lenses Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 (Left) | Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-f/5.6 (Middle) | Nikon 50mm f/1.8 (Right)

Finally to match the apertures I took photos across the range with two equivalence points that were possible on all three lenses, at f/5.6 which is the widest open the 18-55mm Lens could go, and f/8 because…f-8 and be there, or something like that. Additionally I tried out f/2.8 to provide another point of comparison for between the 50mm and the Tamron.


Firstly the f/5.6 Shoot-out…

18-55mm Nikon at f/5.6 18-55mm Nikon at f/5.6

24-70mm Tamron at f/5.6 24-70mm Tamron at f/5.6

50mm Nikon at f/5.6 50mm Nikon at f/5.6


Secondly the f/8 Shoot-out…

18-55mm Nikon at f/8 18-55mm Nikon at f/8

24-70mm Tamron at f/8 24-70mm Tamron at f/8

50mm Nikon at f/8 50mm Nikon at f/8


There’s no question that the 18-55mm Kit Lens is the worst by an obvious margin than both the other lenses. That shouldn’t be a revelation to anyone, it’s the cheapest lens I tried and honestly…it shows.

What’s more interesting is the colour reproduction and the sharpness between the Tamron and the Prime. At f/8 I think the Tamron has better colour and is marginally sharper, but at f/5.6 it’s almost a wash. It’s easy to take the darker lines on the Tamron as the better representation but the Prime picked up the dust and imperfections in the printed lines and text slightly better, leading to a slightly lighter colour.


Finally the f/2.8 Shoot-out…

24-70mm Tamron at f/2.8 24-70mm Tamron at f/2.8

50mm Nikon at f/2.8 50mm Nikon at f/2.8


In the end the Tamron on balance seems slightly sharper than the 50mm Prime at 50mm, but there’s also the amount of light and colour on the Prime is better. So what’s the conclusion? Clearly the Tamron is a fantastic lens, but the 50mm is probably good enough at 50mm, so the question is why do I need both?

For me, personally, what is each lens really for? If I have a 50mm and 85mm Prime, then I don’t really need the Tamron beyond 24mm. What’s clear to me is that I’m well covered between 35mm and 85mm with some great lenses but where I’m lacking in a decent Ultra-wide. The poor quality of the 18-55mm Kit Lens disqualifies it as a contender.

Hence my intention is that I definitely don’t need or want the Kit Lens anymore. It’s just not up the standard I’m looking for in terms of sharpness. Also, as hard as it is for me to part with it, the Tamron doesn’t fit a need I have any more. The gap I need to fill is in the Ultra-Wide category which is difficult with a crop-sensor to achieve, but 24mm isn’t enough. My intention therefore is to replace them both with a sharper Ultra-Wide Lens.

Which lens that is, I’m still uncertain, though the 10-20mm Nikon looks nice.

WhitePapers And Photography

I’ve had two side projects in the past few years I think it’s time to consolidate into TechDistortion. As of today all of my Control System Space whitepapers will be moved here and my PixelFed instance, Chidgey.xyz will be redirected here.

Having looked at the type and volume of traffic it makes sense to consolidate them now rather than let them continue on for another year at their current homes.

The intention is to keep Podcasting over on The Engineered Network and everything else here at TechDistortion.

Podcaster To AudioBook Narrator

I’ve been told for many years that I have a lovely voice, even before I started podcasting; lots more since then. Whilst I’ve been known for my accents and impersonations as well, of which some have actually got me in serious trouble in years past, it seemed a logical extension to consider audiobooks and vocal acting.

Upon putting my name down at an agency I wasn’t sure what to expect and when I landed an audition, then I landed the narration job for an audiobook! I was ecstatic. Once that wore off I signed the contract and realised I was now on the hook to record, edit and supply a complete audiobook that someone else had poured their time, energy and effort into creating the written version of. It was my job to narrate that book and make it sing!

Easy huh?

Oh boy.

I think it’s fair to say that I underestimated how much work it would be and looking back, just how much I learned in making it.

Some of the key lessons I learned from this experience that weren’t obvious to me when I signed up:

  • It is NOT possible to record even a short book in a single recording session especially in the midst of a COVID19 lockdown. My house is my recording studio and with the lockdown restrictions my recording periods are very brief, disjointed and highly problematic. Whilst I accept in future this won’t always be the case it made this particularly challenging. Children, TVs and music blaring, neighbours with too much gardening time on their hands mowing their lawns constantly, a Harley Davison motorbiking enthusiast up the street, it was incredibly frustrating!
  • Keeping a consistent pacing of speech, the same tone and pitch between recordings is extremely difficult. I learned to record in blocks wherever I could to avoid differences in my voice, and keep my positioning in front of the microphone identical every time.
  • Test your gear twice before you start a recording session! I unfortunately had a bad cable and I didn’t realise until I had an hour recorded! I had to re-record all of it.
  • If you put down some audio and you start editing and the levels aren’t the way you like, admit defeat early and re-record it! I made the mistake of persevering with sub-par audio for several hours of editing but after a few listen-backs to the finished product, I just couldn’t give it to the client. It wasn’t good enough. I should have cut my losses hours earlier and admitted I’d had a hardware failure and just re-recorded before I spent any time trying to salvage it.
  • Make sure you pre-record at your set levels, keep the same recording booth layout and confirm all the way through your workflow to your audio editing final output to ensure every link in the chain is set correctly before recording for any significant duration.
  • Scan a few words ahead, read those words after a delay in your brain, listen back to what you said whilst re-reading the same text to confirm you read exactly what was written. This is as hard as it sounds, but after about the 3 hour mark I started to get the hang of it. Like learning Morse Code I was amazed my brain was able to bend itself around that way of read/speak/reviewing but it actually is possible.
  • You might be recording multiple chapters spread over different recording and editing sessions, but the end listener will be listening in succession, hence between Chapters take an extra step and match the volume levels in post-production between each of the Chapters as the final listener will notice the differences.
  • This is someone else’s hard work. When you’re being paid to turn it into an audio form, you need to do your absolute best job to make their work SING! Give them your very best, don’t phone it in. If you need to re-record a sentence, a paragraph, a chapter, the WHOLE THING because it doesn’t make the grade, then just do it and do it right!
  • I edited in Ferrite on my iPad (as I do all my podcasts) and unfortunately there was a strange volume glitch (I submitted a bug report to the developer), but fortunately I learned how to work around it by force-restarting after a second track import which fixed it. Unfortunately I’d sent out a badly volume-matched final audio chapter before I realised the problem was with Ferrite. Not a good look.
  • Expect feedback from the client. I didn’t submit a single full chapter without at least one suggestion for improvement. Sometimes the written word just doesn’t translate into a spoken sentence that sounds correct. Some abbreviations should be spoken in full and others not. The pacing of some sentences and the emphasis might need to shift. I had all that sort of feedback but by incorporating it, I know the client will get the result that they want. It’s their book!

Of course this is the first audiobook I’ve ever recorded for a client. Realistically though it wasn’t what my friends and family expected. Firstly it wasn’t fiction, I didn’t do any voices, and spoke in my normal accent. In some audiobooks I’m aware of, narrators tweak sentences and ad-lib to an extent, lending their own personality to the reading. That isn’t always the case and wasn’t for this book.

Am I Planning Another AudioBook?

Absolutely yes, I am. I’ve done another audition and I’m working on my own series of AudioBooks as an Author-Narrator. The next time I’ll have a much better idea what to expect and am intent on doing an even better job each subsequent book I narrate.

So How Long Was This Book?

The book runs for just a touch under 3 hours, which is quite short for an audiobook but I speak pretty fast. A “normal” narrator should take about 3.5hrs for the same word count. That said my client loved the pacing and that’s what matters to me.

So in terms of Raw Audio, unedited, including all re-records and edits was 5.3hrs of raw audio. The entire book took approximately 28 hours to record, edit, re-record, normalise, remove noises, review and organise ready for release.

That’s a lot. I suspect I’ll get better next book but it’s no walk in the park. I lost about 10 hours where I had to re-record effectively a third of the book so that didn’t help…

Conclusion

The book is “The Knack Of Selling” by Mat Harrington. In reading the book I have to admit, I learned a lot of little things I had long suspected were salesperson “tricks” and a few things I hadn’t picked up on too. So to be completely fair, not only did I record this book for Mat, I learned a lot about sales while I was at it!

It’s currently available on iTunes and the Google Play audiobook stores.

I’m planning my own audiobooks in future and I’m going to record some of my accents as well on my profile page at Findaway Voices.

If you’d like me to record your audiobook, reach out and let me know. I’d love to help bring your work to life too!

Until Overcast For Mac Comes Out

I listen to podcasts a lot. Though less since I’ve been working from home full time. I want everything to channel through my desktop when I’m in front of it, so the best option for me is an integrated Podcast player that works on all iOS platforms, including the iPad, iPhone, Apple Watch and macOS. The Apple Podcasts app meets this requirement but I don’t like the missing smart speed, nor the way it handles playlists, podcast specific settings and so on that Overcast handles just the way I like it. (I’m a creature of habit too, I suppose)

Of course Marco has toyed with spending time developing a macOS port of Overcast but until that happens I needed a work-around. The requirements for my use case:

  • Use the Macbook Pro Audio System (External Speakers via the Audio Output on my Thunderbolt Dock)
  • Control Playback/Pause from the Macbook Pro keyboard
  • Keeps sync position for Overcast

I tried Undercast and a few other web-wrappers but to be honest, they were all terrible. The Web player is a bare-minimum passable option that gets you by in a pinch but that’s all. Then I remembered you can turn your Mac into an AirPlay receiver by using an app from Rogue Amoeba. AirFoil Satellite can be trialled free but a licence costs $29 USD (plus applicable taxes). I had a copy laying around from years ago and I always just install it (just in case) on every new machine.

Open AirFoil Satellite and set a Play/Pause shortcut that makes sense for you (I chose Command-Shift-P) and then write an AppleScript to activate and then send the keyboard shortcut and give that a keyboard shortcut via FastScripts. I chose F17 (I love my extended keyboard).

  on run
    if application "Airfoil Satellite" is running then
      tell application "Airfoil Satellite" to activate
        tell application "System Events" to tell process "Airfoil Satellite" to keystroke "P" using {command down, shift down}
      return
    end if
  end run

It’s not perfect but meets my criteria. There are other applications out there that do similar things and I’ve had trouble with Automator since the Catalina update restricting what can be executed as a global shortcut from ANYWHERE, which is why I’ve switched to FastScripts.

Hopefully that’s useful to someone, until native macOS app is released in the future. You can just load up your playlist, pipe it through your desktop speakers, sync position is kept, smart speed is your best friend, and away you go :)